Immersive Wire https://www.immersivewire.com/ Analysing the virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR) and metaverse news that matters Sun, 27 Nov 2022 23:58:49 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=6.1.1 https://www.immersivewire.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/cropped-Virtual-Perceptions-logo-smaller-1-32x32.png Immersive Wire https://www.immersivewire.com/ 32 32 20% of Meta’s total budget goes to Reality Labs https://www.immersivewire.com/20-of-metas-total-budget-goes-to-reality-labs/ Mon, 28 Nov 2022 07:50:00 +0000 https://www.immersivewire.com/?p=12797 28 November 2022 - Meta is also spending 50% of Reality Labs' budget on R&D for AR glasses, while 10% goes to Horizon.

The post 20% of Meta’s total budget goes to Reality Labs appeared first on Immersive Wire.

]]>
Your weekly briefing on the metaverse // 28 November 2022
by Tom Ffiske

Executive summary:

  • Headline: Meta is spending 20% of its budget on Reality Labs, and 50% of that goes into R&D for AR glasses (analysis below).
  • Lesson to learn: Don’t overpromise on a project, or shill too hard via partnerships. Sounds simple; but if you don’t, you may face a massive backlash that erupts in controversy… as Paradox Studios saw this week (analysis below).
  • Metrics: I took a peek at measuring success in the metaverse, which can come down to dwell time, conversions, engagement, or perhaps just the sheer number of visitors.
  • Stat of the week: European metaverse startups have raised $666m (up from $121m in 2021) according to Dealroom.

See some of you in Rotterdam for Immersive Tech Week! I have spare tickets, so if anyone wants to come along too, let me know – Tom Ffiske, Editor of the Immersive Wire

Want to be fully briefed each week? Sign up to get it directly to your inbox.


A division of finances, in Reality (Labs)

Meta is spending 50% of Reality Labs’ budget on R&D for AR glasses, while 10% goes to Horizon.

  • What strikes me is the actual percentage of the budget dedicated to Reality Labs. The media narrative discusses how Meta is pouring billions into its division to architect the future of the metaverse. In absolute terms, billions of dollars is a lot; but compared to the wider company, it is still 1/5 of the company’s monetary dedication.
  • The same goes for the focus on Horizon. Many incorrectly conflate Meta’s vision for the metaverse with the Horizon platform, when it forms one part of its overall strategy. Even then, it is a smaller fraction of Reality Labs’ budget.
  • Still, let’s be careful with the numbers. Percentage divisions of budgets obscure the size, scale, and leadership oversight that parts of Reality Labs may focus upon. The true impact of the finances will come when the R&D for AR glasses bears fruit.

Paradox Studios is in hot water after partnering with a popular Youtube and mishandling its allegations of scam.

  • First, a brief summary. Paradox Studios is launching the Paradox Metaverse, a virtual world that uses its own virtual currency. A popular Youtuber, iShowSpeed, partnered with Paradox Studios to promote the project. So far, so normal.
  • Then it went downhill. During and after the stream, the team got hit by a wave of fans who thought it was a scam. Another popular YouTuber, Coffeezilla, hosted a two-hour stream interviewing the founders, where they received even more negative press. The founders then released a video to clear the noise… and then allegedly threatened content creators who criticised him, saying he will ‘smash [their] teeth in.’
  • What can we learn from this? First, do not promise that a currency can accrue value multiple times over in a short space of time. Even if there is evidence for this, it will raise red flags for people who are not as tied to the product. Second, I recommend conducting interviews in a measured way and avoiding rising to the bait, as it can otherwise give fuel to the fire. Finally, go quiet after a controversy; release one detailed piece of content outlying the situation, then focus on the product. Further videos or reactions will only keep the negative headlines in public for longer.

What do you think of Paradox Metaverse? Join the discussion and meet like-minded professionals on the Immersive Wire Discord.


My new audiobook

The Metaverse: A Professional Guide is now available as an audiobook on Audible! Listen to the audio version of the book, highly rated by professionals in our space. One review from Amazon: ‘It is definitely a book worth reading and for those who know more there are lots of facts, insights and explanations across the metaverse, AR, VR, and its applications. As Tom Ffiske outlines, this is a never-ending journey so I’m pleased to have started the journey with this book’

Get it in your region:

USAFrance
UKGermany

Elsewhere


Important stories over the last week

Got stories? Do let me know at tom (at) immersivewire (dot) com. 

  • Animoca Brands is working with 14 new brands and celebs for The Sandbox, including Paris Hilton and Snoop Dog.
  • Deloitte found that the metaverse could add $1.4trn to GDP by 2035.
  • ENGAGE XR signed a commercial reseller agreement with Lenovo.
  • FundamentalVR announced the expansion of its executive team with the addition of four leaders.
  • inCitu, which does AR visualisations, raised $2m in funding.
  • Kellogg’s is partnering with Blamkos Block Party for its metaverse play.
  • The LGBTQ + VR Museum will come to Cardiff in December.
  • Macy’s is making a metaverse parade.
  • Global Counsel published a new report on regulating the metaverse.
  • McKinsey found that women are more likely to spend time in the metaverse, but less likely to hold leadership positions in related companies.
  • Nreal updated its AR smartglasses to also work with Apple computers.
  • Oxford English Dictionary has put to public vote whether ‘metaverse’ should be word of the year.
  • Thirdverse, a web3 gaming platform, raised $15m in funding to grow its dev team.
  • Wintor is working with several Dutch tourist destinations to provide AR tours.

Looking for assistance

Want to receive help from readers of the Immersive Wire? Send an email with ‘looking for assistance’ in the subject line to tom (at) immersivewire (dot) com.

  • Bodyswaps, a VR Platform for soft skills training, is looking for a freelance content writer to help spread the good word about VR in education. Get in touch here.

Improving accessibility

Thomas Logan, CEO of Equal Entry and founder of Accessibility Virtual Reality (A11yVR)

What is your background?

I’ve spent the past 20 years assisting organizations to create technology solutions that work for people with disabilities. Over my career, I’ve delivered projects for many federal, state, and local government agencies as well as private sector organizations from startups to Fortune 500s. 

I’m the Founder and CEO of Equal Entry, an accessibility consulting firm. Our mission is “contributing to a more accessible world.” I’m also the founder and organizer of Accessibility Virtual Reality (A11yVR) and co-founder and co-organizer of Accessibility New York (A11yNYC). Both are monthly Meetups for people interested in topics related to accessibility and people with disabilities. A11yVR focuses on accessibility in extended reality including virtual, augmented, and mixed reality. I live in Tokyo, Japan.

What are you working on, and what’s a key learning that you’ve had from it? 

I am currently working on a project in WebXR related to providing solutions for people who are blind and low vision. This project uses new concepts for labeling 3D objects and providing attributes about the 3D objects through new controller interaction methods.

I also have worked with my team recently on a customized version of Mozilla Hubs that allowed screen reader users to perform a lot of functions in the interface through chat commands such as navigating around the space and finding specific avatars in the space. 

I also am constantly on the lookout for new projects to work on related to people with disabilities and virtual reality technologies. 

If you had to give one piece of advice, what would you give? 

Make your virtual reality software accessible to people with disabilities and your product will also be easier for all of your customers to use. A great place to start is considering the following things:

  • Use text-to-speech, 
  • Use speech-to-text
  • Allow your users to set font type, text size, and color preferences
  • Add captions for all spoken dialog, music, and sounds
  • Provide multiple communication and input options.  

Related to this area is the extremely important consideration of designing safe alternatives to locomotion and movement to avoid nausea and sickness.  

Visit Thomas Logan’s company website or LinkedIn to learn more.


Subscribe to the Immersive Wire newsletter

Level up your knowledge of VR, AR, and the metaverse with rigorous and high-quality analysis, to gain a competitive advantage against your peers. By subscribing, you also receive a free PDF copy of the Immersive Reality Revolution, a bestselling book on the industry. Curated by Tom Ffiske every Wednesday and Sunday, and enjoyed by over 5,000 professionals.

Additional reporting can be found on the news or previous newsletters sections of the Immersive Wire.

By subscribing, you agree to the Privacy Policy of the site. You can unsubscribe at any time. If there are any issues, please contact the administrator here.


Meditative with the VIVE Flow. Photo credit: Tom Ffiske

Tom Ffiske

Editor, Immersive Wire

Tom Ffiske is the Editor of the Immersive Wire, a weekly newsletter on the immersive industry.

The post 20% of Meta’s total budget goes to Reality Labs appeared first on Immersive Wire.

]]>
What the industrial metaverse is, and why it’s important https://www.immersivewire.com/the-industrial-metaverse/ Sun, 27 Nov 2022 23:58:48 +0000 https://www.immersivewire.com/?p=12824 In short, the industrial metaverse is part of a wider technological wave in relation to the future of spatial technologies. Manufacturers deploy digital twins to simulate processes before production. Supply chains use blockchain systems to keep track of assets that move globally. Factories use immersive technologies like augmented reality (AR), to improve their processes. All… Read More »What the industrial metaverse is, and why it’s important

The post What the industrial metaverse is, and why it’s important appeared first on Immersive Wire.

]]>
In short, the industrial metaverse is part of a wider technological wave in relation to the future of spatial technologies. Manufacturers deploy digital twins to simulate processes before production. Supply chains use blockchain systems to keep track of assets that move globally. Factories use immersive technologies like augmented reality (AR), to improve their processes. All of these technologies have existed long before; but together, they combine into the overall trend we see today.

The article will give a thorough guide on the metaverse and its contingent factors, to paint a clear picture of the future of digital tech. In short, the commercial and efficiency gains from deploying immersive technologies are important to understand, not least to help businesses prepare for the future. The metaverse itself is prone to hype and speculation, obscuring its potential. The aim is to piece the veil, and reach its heart.

If you are interested in learning more about the industrial metaverse (and beyond), consider subscribing to the free Immersive Wire newsletter. The weekly briefing analyses the top stories in a concise way, giving you an edge in business discussions:

By subscribing, you agree to the Privacy Policy of the site. You can unsubscribe at any time. If there are any issues, please contact the administrator here.


Contents

What is the industrial metaverse?

The industrial metaverse is an umbrella term for the matrix of immersive technologies that are improving company processes, across multiple industries. The related technologies include digital twins, blockchain, AR, and to a lesser extent VR. All of these technologies are also part of the wider metaverse, which is also impacting consumer brands and marketers. But in a company context, they are used to improve manufacturing processes as a whole.

Take digital twins, as one example. Think of them as creating digital replicas of the real world, as virtual assets that can be manipulated, or tested on. Now expand the idea to encompass a whole factory, or even a city. A whole area can be digitally represented, which can then help plan improvements, migrations, or additions. The replicas are useful because potential problems with a project can be identified and solved before deployment, saving money and time. Errors in improving a factory can be avoided, or product flaws scrubbed clean.

AR is part of the industrial metaverse as well. Imagine having a digital overlay which streams relevant data to your everyday work, showing statistics or guidance on your work within a factory. The process can help save time, while safely guiding you safely via step-by-step instructions. One example is Seaport Steel, a company that used RealWear glasses to guide workers through steel cutting, inspections, and maintenance:

Workers used immersive technologies like AR, to guide them through work. Video credit: RealWear.

What is the impact of the metaverse on industries?

The metaverse has a wide definition and scope, with a wide array of benefits. Companies have deployed effective projects over the last few years which demonstrate the value of immersive technologies. Some examples:

  • Efficiency: Digital twins ensure that planning processes are streamlined efficiently, ensuring that no issues arise during development. Fixing an error post-construction takes time and money. In short, digital twins help people to measure twice and cut once.
  • Safety: By using technologies like AR glasses, companies can safely guide people through complex operations. Hands-free organisation helps people execute their tasks well.
  • Productivity: The best business and day-to-day decisions rely on a stream of high-quality data. Using technologies like AR glasses can help workers better understand what needs to be done as part of the core factory pipeline. This is one of the core benefits of the industrial metaverse.
  • Transparency: Asset tracking is important for supply-chain businesses that need to understand the true numbers of materials, products, and resources across their network. Blockchain-based technologies provide a natural complement, tracking each item from start to finish.

What is the market size of the industrial metaverse?

Calculating the market size of the industrial metaverse is difficult to pin down, as it can encompass multiple industries. Predicting its further growth is tricky too, as it can encompass new types of work that we do not see today. Ask someone in the 1990s how the internet would evolve, and few would come close to pinpointing its form today. Take these wider figures as an example, from trusted institutions:

  • Frost & Sullivan: $750bn by 2030;
  • McKinsey & Company: $5trn by 2030;
  • Citi Bank: $13trn by 2030.

All of the numbers reflect the value of the metaverse by 2030. The numbers include the industrial side, but few studies parse the data away from the likes of economic or consumer applications. We can be certain the market size will be large, but the actual number is hard to define. More analysis is needed, over time.

How is it different from the enterprise metaverse?

Think of the enterprise side as a more collaborative form of the same trend. The industrial metaverse focuses on processes and improvements, deploying immersive technologies across the chain. The enterprise side is more among team members, improving ways in which they can work together or learn new skills. The former may use digital twins to peek at city planning; the latter may use virtual reality (VR) to collaborate closely. The headsets could be made by Meta, Pico, or HTC.

Take Mesmerise, a company that deploys VR solutions that help make large meetings. International teams can sit and interact with one another, lending a sense of presence to remote teams. The same company also developed an immersive experience that helps to boost resilience, using VR to help compound the teaching.

Unlike the industrial metaverse, the enterprise side is more on training and collaboration. Photo credit: Mesmerise.
Unlike the industrial metaverse, the enterprise side is more on training and collaboration. Photo credit: Mesmerise.

How you can prepare your company

The industrial metaverse introduces a new kind of potential for businesses that wish to ramp up their processes. Not every type of company needs to take the journey; a corner shop does not need to implement a cornerstone activation. But even simple visualisations can help to guide work over time, or even get insights that will give drastic improvements over time.

The journey starts with general observation and enquiry. Take a look at examples across the industry, and get to the heart of each one. Why does it work? And what metrics were important for each one? What did it succeed on, and what was less good on? The close scrutiny can then help to improve your own business over time, or to seek solutions that suit you best.

If you wish to be kept abreast of the key themes of the metaverse, then consider checking out the Immersive Wire below.


Subscribe to the Immersive Wire newsletter

Level up your knowledge of VR, AR, and the metaverse with rigorous and high-quality analysis, to gain a competitive advantage against your peers. By subscribing, you also receive a free PDF copy of the Immersive Reality Revolution, a bestselling book on the industry. Curated by Tom Ffiske every Wednesday and Sunday, and enjoyed by over 5,000 professionals.

Additional reporting can be found on the news or previous newsletters sections of the Immersive Wire.

By subscribing, you agree to the Privacy Policy of the site. You can unsubscribe at any time. If there are any issues, please contact the administrator here.


Meditative with the VIVE Flow. Photo credit: Tom Ffiske

Tom Ffiske

Editor, Immersive Wire

Tom Ffiske is the Editor of the Immersive Wire, a weekly newsletter on the immersive industry.

The post What the industrial metaverse is, and why it’s important appeared first on Immersive Wire.

]]>
Metaverse metrics: How to measure ROI and KPIs https://www.immersivewire.com/metaverse-metrics-measure-roi-kpis/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 18:11:26 +0000 https://www.immersivewire.com/?p=12636 Metaverse metrics are vital to measuring the success of any experience. Definable goals and KPIs are vital in any other part of the business, from performance marketing to sales figures. The same is true in the immersive tech space, ranging from Roblox partnering with brands to reach Gen Z audiences, to Decentraland hosting major events… Read More »Metaverse metrics: How to measure ROI and KPIs

The post Metaverse metrics: How to measure ROI and KPIs appeared first on Immersive Wire.

]]>
Metaverse metrics are vital to measuring the success of any experience. Definable goals and KPIs are vital in any other part of the business, from performance marketing to sales figures. The same is true in the immersive tech space, ranging from Roblox partnering with brands to reach Gen Z audiences, to Decentraland hosting major events such as Music Week. The same is true for more blockchain-based activities too, forming new types of communities under the banner of web3.

The article will go into detail on the kinds of metrics to consider. Success comes down to shaping the proposition for the customer or visitor, and building upwards from there. Example KPIs can rely on dwell time, customer conversations, or engagement levels within a community. All of them could be used on different levels, but should be applied when building upwards.

If you are interested in learning more about the metaverse, and how to succeed in the space, consider subscribing to the free Immersive Wire newsletter. The weekly briefing analyses the top stories in a concise way, helping you understand the development of the metaverse:

By subscribing, you agree to the Privacy Policy of the site. You can unsubscribe at any time. If there are any issues, please contact the administrator here.


Contents

Establishing the type of metaverse experience

The first step any company must take is to establish what success looks like. The best metaverse experiences match the customer profile of the business, shaping it for their own needs and desires. Any experience that goes too far off the beaten path risks obscurity. For example, younger people are more likely to own crypto wallets; for them, a web3-based experience may work better. Or perhaps the experience is designed by a company for corporate engagement; in which case, a web-based virtual world may work better.

Other types of metaverse experiences to consider:

  • Blockchain-based community in web3: Communities that are based on blockchain technologies, such as Ethereum, can form strong bonds through tokenised access. Examples include Nouns and Bored Ape Yacht Club.
  • Web-based virtual worlds: Social spaces can host communities that can come together, to either socialise or attend events. Examples include Decentraland and Roblox, which can host thousands (or many more) in a space.
  • VR-based virtual worlds: Similar to the above, these virtual spaces can be much more immersive as people roam across virtual worlds within their own avatars. Examples include Horizon Worlds and VRChat.

‘The metaverse for me is a place that connects people together, so the two most important metrics are number of connections that a user or player has made with someone else, and the time spent with one another, which is hopefully a proxy for depth of connection.’

– Elijah Tai, co-founder of Zesty

DCG and Jamestown worked together to make a metaverse experience in Decentraland. Photo credit: Jamestown.
DCG and Jamestown worked together to make a metaverse experience in Decentraland. Photo credit: Jamestown.

How do you measure success in the metaverse?

Once done, it is then time to establish what success looks like. Measuring it depends on the goals of the company building it, and then ironing out the metaverse metrics. All companies and activations have different goals and objectives, and each would focus on a different area.

Take corporate businesses as one example. An enterprise company would focus on employee engagement and memory retention. For them, success would mean lots of employees who visited the experience and remember it a while later. The number of visitors and dwell time would be key metrics to measure in that particular case.

By contrast, a consumer brand would want to ensure it sparks online discussions and stay in the virtual world as long as possible. The customers may then be guided to purchase items on-site, or the bulk of the product would come from selling tickets to enter the location (if it was events-based). Key KPIs would include the conversion rate of visitors, or the revenue generated from the sale of virtual assets.

A similarity between B2B and B2C is the focus on retention; the longer a person roams in a virtual location, the more successful the experience. But beyond that, different audiences would have alternating goals. Measuring success can include dwell time, conversions, and sales. All of them will be explored in the next section.

‘I don’t think that these measurements need to be always publicly accessible as there is often more to it than a pure single metric. For instance, with our ‘mini metaverse’ developments we’d rather look at user engagement over pure numbers, retention > acquisition at the start of most product journeys before the number of users increases.’

– Simon Barratt, CEO and co-founder of Cooperative Innovations

Example metaverse metrics

  • Number of visitors: A crude example is the raw number of people who visit an experience. The flashy numbers can then be used to show the popularity of key events; for example, Decentraland hosted over 100,000 people during Metaverse Fashion Week. But be careful. Other metrics may show a greater kind of success, depending on the goal of the business.
  • Conversation rate: If a customer visits a virtual world and then buys a product within it, then a person is converted within the experience. The conversion rate can then be calculated by tracking how many people visited a location and bought items on-site. The statistics can also show if certain people buy particular products; the data can then be used to innovate on the space for future activations.
  • Dwell time: If a customer stays in a metaverse experience, then it reflects a prolonged period of engagement within a brand experience. Compare this to social media, where people skim through content in mere seconds. Or a TV ad, which may engage people for up to thirty seconds but is trickier to pin down the long-term impact. The average duration of a user within an online experience provides valuable insights into how genuinely interesting the location is for the visitor.
  • Community engagement: As web3 technologies can help to build tight communities, one of the main metaverse metrics relates to engagement. If users join via a token and leave quickly, then it may not be designed with retention in mind. The longer a person stays and socialises, the stronger the tie with the individual.

‘It comes down to this: where do you see yourself? Are you building as part of the metaverse, or are you claiming to be building ‘a metaverse’? These are fundamentally two different archetypes.’

– Jesse Alton, founder of AngellXR and co-chair at Open Metaverse Interoperability group (OMI)

More information can be found in an excellent report by Gorilla in the room, exploring further measurement methods:

metaverse measurement gap
Certain behaviours are more important to track than others. Photo credit: Gorilla in the room.

How do you test a metaverse?

Before deployment, it is important to test a metaverse to see if it works well. Sometimes this can be difficult, as companies may be constrained by time or resources. There may also be no room for experimentation too. Testing also differentiates between metaverse experiences; Roblox has a different suite of tools from Decentraland, for example. With that said, here are some tips:

  • Deploy a private version, and invite team members to test. This can be done to build qualitative data before it goes live publically.
  • Test a process before deployment, across a range of devices. The onboarding experience for mobile phones may be very different from desktop computers. Look across multiple different devices to halt headaches long beforehand.
  • Give yourself time. Prototyping is an important part of the design process, and it is important to give a product time to breathe. With time comes innovation, and the experience can be improved before its formal launch.

‘Just as in the evolution of digital marketing, being able to track cross-platform and cross-device will also be needed.’

Casey Jensen VP of US sales and marketing at rooom Inc

How can you measure ROI?

Investing in a metaverse experience can be expensive. Brands can take risks innovating and building new types of experiences, and learning from them over time. Some succeeded; Nike’s own Nikeland had 21 million people who visited it over a year, and unveiled its own web3 platform to capture new users. Others have flopped, investing hundreds of thousands – or perhaps millions – into failed experiences.

As explored previously, the ROI depends on the goals of the business. Once they are ironed out and crystal-clear, then it is a solid board to jump off from. If the metaverse experience is more consumer-orientated, then success can be measured by the volume of NFTs which had been sold. For example, Adidas sold 30,000 NFTs in December 2021, earning more than $22m in the process. By comparing the revenue with the cost of setting up the NFT campaign, then the ROI can be swiftly calculated. These types of metaverse metrics help to pinpoint what success looks like, in a concrete manner.

The most important piece of advice is to iron out the goals right from the beginning, and build an experience designed around the needs of the end user. Failing to do so will risk a half-hearted metaverse activation that lands flat.

‘You need CCU to make the place feel alive. You need ARPU to keep the lights on.’

Albert Millis, COO of Virtual Umbrella


Subscribe to the Immersive Wire newsletter

Level up your knowledge of VR, AR, and the metaverse with rigorous and high-quality analysis, to gain a competitive advantage against your peers. By subscribing, you also receive a free PDF copy of the Immersive Reality Revolution, a bestselling book on the industry. Curated by Tom Ffiske every Wednesday and Sunday, and enjoyed by over 5,000 professionals.

By subscribing, you agree to the Privacy Policy of the site. You can unsubscribe at any time. If there are any issues, please contact the administrator here.


Meditative with the VIVE Flow. Photo credit: Tom Ffiske

Tom Ffiske

Editor, Immersive Wire

Tom Ffiske is the Editor of the Immersive Wire, a weekly newsletter on the immersive industry.

The post Metaverse metrics: How to measure ROI and KPIs appeared first on Immersive Wire.

]]>
Paradox Metaverse controversy: Why Youtubers alleged that it is a ‘scam’ https://www.immersivewire.com/paradox-metaverse-alledged-scam-coffeezilla-ishowspeed/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 18:05:11 +0000 https://www.immersivewire.com/?p=12613 More details on the Paradox Metaverse ecosystem. Photo credit: Paradox Studios.

The post Paradox Metaverse controversy: Why Youtubers alleged that it is a ‘scam’ appeared first on Immersive Wire.

]]>
The Paradox Metaverse became a trending topic recently, ahead of its full launch later this year. After a mint earlier in 2022, and a roadmap to build interest in the new platform, it received a variety of scathing remarks that questions its legitimacy. Youtubers like Coffeezilla have questioned representatives from the company, enquiring whether it is a scam, while others, like iShowSpeed, endorsed the project.

To be clear, there is no direct evidence of whether it is a scam or not. But it has sparked a vibrant debate online, stoked by people who are investigating the company further. This article will go into detail on the events this week.

If you wish to be kept up to date with more analysis on the metaverse, consider subscribing to the Immersive Wire. It is a free weekly newsletter that analyses the industry, cutting the fluff:

By subscribing, you agree to the Privacy Policy of the site. You can unsubscribe at any time. If there are any issues, please contact the administrator here.


What is Paradox Metaverse?

The Paradox Metaverse is an open-world action and adventure game created by London-based Paradox Studios, where players roam the world to explore, socialise, and combat one another. The story has flecks of science fiction and cyberpunk, as a city is overrun with an antagonistic force; the player takes part in Paradox City, and fights enemies with their wits and abilities.

Basically, players first buy an NFT character from the limited NFT collection. These NFTs will allow gamers to access missions, and once completed, they will be rewarded with the game’s native currency, “P-bucks.” Then, they can be swapped for $PARA, the in-game currency. The game reached popularity after a range of rap artists shared the title, and several crypto exchanges partnered up, such as Opensea, Uniswap, and Binance. Perhaps the most significant partnership was with Unreal Engine, which forms the backbone of the title. The title has become infamous as well, sparking debates on whether it is a scam or not.

More details on the Paradox Metaverse ecosystem. Photo credit: Paradox Studios.

Is Paradox Metaverse a scam?

While it sparked debate on its legitimacy as a games platform, the creators have said it is legitimate. When asked whether it is a get-rich-quick scheme by Coffeezilla, representatives of Paradox Studios said ‘of course it isn’t.’ Rather, the company said in a press release that they wish to ‘revamp the blockchain gaming market and has been working towards the development of the paradox metaverse.’ Importantly, there is no direct evidence that it is a scam.

The team is also passionate about the title, with a long-term vision of its journey. ‘Our team is committed to making the best gaming experience for users, wanting that to be in the story, graphics and mechanics of the game,’ said its whitepaper. Additionally, its website lays out a long-term plan, which will fully launch soon. (Then again, the whitepaper did misspell ‘blockchain’ at the time of writing, which does raise an eyebrow).

In my opinion, I would be cautious. Like with all blockchain-based projects, I recommend conducting extensive research before committing your finances to a new project.

The Immersive Wire has outreached to Paradox Studios for comment.

Coffeezilla confronting Paradox Studios on whether it is a get-rich-quick scheme. Video credit: The Drip.

How is iShowSpeed part of this?

iShowSpeed started promoting the game in mid-November, wearing Paradox Metaverse apparel and directing listeners to purchase $PARA on streams. It was clear that iShowSpeed partnered with the company to promote the game, though the length and depth of the relationship have not been disclosed.

In a later statement, iShowSpeed discussed the partnership and how it was a ‘mistake’ that he took part in the partnership. He commented that he is ‘not a scammer’ as well, as shown in this clip.

Dot Esports has done further reporting on this, and I highly recommend giving it a read if you want to read more about it.

How did Paradox respond to the allegations?

In response, the founder of Paradox Studios gave a comment on the situation. Amio Talio outlined what happened during the stream with iShowSpeed, and repeated that Paradox Metaverse is not a scam. He also emphasised that the company will continue in the long-run, and will continue building on its project over time. ‘We are here to stay, one way or another,’ he said.

Based on the contents of the video, it seems that Paradox Studios wishes to diffuse the situation and move on with its plan.

Since then the comments on the video have been turned off, and moistcr1tical released a video where he criticised Amio Talio’s wording and positioning. Coffeezilla has since followed up with a video which alleges that Amio Talio threatens smaller creators.


Subscribe to the Immersive Wire newsletter

Level up your knowledge of VR, AR, and the metaverse with rigorous and high-quality analysis, to gain a competitive advantage against your peers. By subscribing, you also receive a free PDF copy of the Immersive Reality Revolution, a bestselling book on the industry. Curated by Tom Ffiske every Wednesday and Sunday, and enjoyed by over 5,000 professionals.

By subscribing, you agree to the Privacy Policy of the site. You can unsubscribe at any time. If there are any issues, please contact the administrator here.


Meditative with the VIVE Flow. Photo credit: Tom Ffiske

Tom Ffiske

Editor, Immersive Wire

Tom Ffiske is the Editor of the Immersive Wire, a weekly newsletter on the immersive industry.

The post Paradox Metaverse controversy: Why Youtubers alleged that it is a ‘scam’ appeared first on Immersive Wire.

]]>
ATLAS: EARTH has 50,000 daily active users after its first year https://www.immersivewire.com/atlas-earth-has-50000-daily-active-users-after-its-first-year/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 07:09:00 +0000 https://www.immersivewire.com/?p=12522 21 November 2022 - ATLAS: EARTH, a virtual real estate title has a fair few people playing each day: 50,000 daily active users.

The post ATLAS: EARTH has 50,000 daily active users after its first year appeared first on Immersive Wire.

]]>
Your weekly briefing on the metaverse // 21 November 2022
by Tom Ffiske

Executive summary:

  • Exclusive story: ATLAS: EARTH, a virtual real estate title has a fair few people playing each day: 50,000 daily active users (analysis below);
  • Headline: Pico may miss sales targets with its VR headsets, according to a report (analysis below);
  • Stat of the week: 86% of companies using AR for onboarding say the tech has improved the quality of training, according to a survey from TeamViewer;
  • Conversation-starter: Harry and Meghan may hop into the metaverse, according to a report. Someone allegedly close to them said that they ‘will have an even greater ability to spread their message if they have a presence in the virtual world as well as the physical world. They’ve spoken to a variety of experts and the view is this is the next stage to take their brand truly global.’

I adored God of War Ragnarok; an epic story about the bonds of prophecy, mixed with a personal story about family. Highly recommend! Also, I was mentioned in Sky News talking about metaverse land interoperability, referencing this piece from last week – Tom Ffiske, Editor of the Immersive Wire

Want to be fully briefed each week? Sign up to get it directly to your inbox.


A peek at Pico, and metaverse land interest?

Exclusive story: ATLAS: EARTH has 50,000 daily active users after its first year.

  • This is not a blockchain or web3 company. Instead, it focuses on the spatial side of the metaverse, where players can only buy land where they physically are. The company has sold over 4.5 million parcels in the US, selling a parcel of land every 4-6 seconds.
  • Even Mastercard is taking part. The payments company announced that it links ATLAS: EARTH to its loyalty program. Compare this to other metaverse land platforms that are taking a dip, as I explored last week.
  • It raises the question of whether blockchain technologies are necessary to convey ownership. I argue it does establish ownership, to some extent; it’s a ledger that helps to validate identities. At the same time, the concept of ownership goes beyond tech. Sami Khan, the co-founder and CEO of Atlas Reality, gave a telling quote to App Developer Magazine: ‘For us, ownership is not just proving in a line of code that something is yours. Ownership is about getting a fair share of something you or your digital self participates in via time, money, or effort.’

Pico may miss expectations this year, selling less than one million headsets.

  • The company has already cut manufacturing from 2.5m headsets to 1.8m, while potentially making a loss on each one. This is interesting because Pico also said European customers may see delays to orders due to high global demand.
  • In my view, not enough time has elapsed to fully judge its performance. The company made a big decision to focus more on Europe and less so on the US, which may bear fruit in 2023. With the development fund, it takes time for exclusive Pico titles to come through – which the company would have forecasted when planning its long-term strategy. We should have a better idea of its trajectory in the months to come.

What do you think of Pico’s activities? Join the discussion and meet like-minded professionals on the Immersive Wire Discord.


My new audiobook

The Metaverse: A Professional Guide is now available as an audiobook on Audible! Listen to the audio version of the book, highly rated by professionals in our space. One review from Amazon: ‘It is definitely a book worth reading and for those who know more there are lots of facts, insights and explanations across the metaverse, AR, VR, and its applications. As Tom Ffiske outlines, this is a never-ending journey so I’m pleased to have started the journey with this book’

Get it in your region:

USAFrance
UKGermany

Elsewhere


Important stories over the last week

Got stories? Do let me know at tom (at) immersivewire (dot) com. 

  • AIXR unveiled the recipient of this year’s ‘Accenture VR Lifetime Achievement’ award, Dr. Jacquelyn Ford Morie.
  • AllCertified allows individuals to create and manage blockchain-authenticated autographs via NFTs.
  • AmazeVR‘s Enter Thee Hottieverse, a VR concert starring Megan Thee Stallion, will be available in Meta’s App Lab on 30 November.
  • AWE is calling for proposals to speak or exhibit at AWE USA 2023.
  • Chipotle‘s CMO reflected on a year of metaverse activations.
  • FitXR will launch a few new music collections for workout classes: Backstreet Boys, Wham!, and Billy Idol on 25 November; and Lady Gaga, Dua Lipa, Pink, Miley Cyrus, and more on 12 December.
  • Google added more AR capabilities to its search engine.
  • Health Education England made a VR experience for nurses to remotely assist in prisons.
  • HTC had its headset leaked by SadlyItsBradley.
  • Immersive Tech Week is starting next week in Rotterdam.
    • Let me know if you’re coming along, as I will be there too!
  • ITRI, Taiwan’s tech research institution, introduced a new type of display for AR glasses.
  • Meta announced a partnership with Bodyswaps to give 100 higher and further education institutions access to VR across the UK, North America, France, and Belgium
  • Niantic and Qualcomm unveiled a reference design for their AR headset.
    • Qualcomm also announced the AR2 Gen 1, designed for AR glasses (Virtual Vector does a great analysis of this).
  • Nike will open .Swoosh – its own virtual asset platform – by the end of this month.
  • Omdia reported that consumer VR will be worth $6.9bn in 2022, and may increase to $20bn in 2027.
  • Pico announced that it will be the first to publish Survival Nation for standalone VR headsets.
  • Ready Player Golf is a charity event raising money for Children’s Cancer Research Fund, happening on 25 November.
  • RealWear announced that DanBred deployed AR wearables for the remote inspection of pig herds
  • Sphere is a new decentralized, sports-centric metaverse, with an initial focus on football.
  • Towards a Digital Renaissance is a new book by Jeremy Silver, CEO of Digital Catapult, on tech ecosystems – with a peek into the metaverse as well.
  • TriggerXR worked on a Duran Duran experience for the Snapdragon Summit.
  • Tuvalu will become the first digital nation, announced around COP27.
  • VictoryXR and HTC VIVE announced a partnership to deliver a dissection curriculum covering frogs, pigs, and the human brain in VR.
  • Virtuleap won the Call for Innovation ‘Wellness & the Metaverse’ competition.
  • YAHAHA raised $40m in funding, to grow its platform.

Looking for assistance

Want to receive help from readers of the Immersive Wire? Send an email with ‘looking for assistance’ in the subject line to tom (at) immersivewire (dot) com.

  • Bodyswaps, a VR Platform for soft skills training, is looking for a freelance content writer to help spread the good word about VR in education. Get in touch here.

Subscribe to the Immersive Wire newsletter

Level up your knowledge of VR, AR, and the metaverse with rigorous and high-quality analysis, to gain a competitive advantage against your peers. By subscribing, you also receive a free PDF copy of the Immersive Reality Revolution, a bestselling book on the industry. Curated by Tom Ffiske every Wednesday and Sunday, and enjoyed by over 5,000 professionals.

By subscribing, you agree to the Privacy Policy of the site. You can unsubscribe at any time. If there are any issues, please contact the administrator here.


Meditative with the VIVE Flow. Photo credit: Tom Ffiske

Tom Ffiske

Editor, Immersive Wire

Tom Ffiske is the Editor of the Immersive Wire, a weekly newsletter on the immersive industry.

The post ATLAS: EARTH has 50,000 daily active users after its first year appeared first on Immersive Wire.

]]>
Metaverse analysis: Everything you need to know about the market https://www.immersivewire.com/metaverse-analysis-market/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 12:55:28 +0000 https://www.immersivewire.com/?p=12489 What do you want to know about the next era of the internet and its market? This article conducts some metaverse analysis to help inform your business and activities.

The post Metaverse analysis: Everything you need to know about the market appeared first on Immersive Wire.

]]>
The metaverse market has grown quickly over the last few years, and accelerated by Facebook changing its name to Meta in 2021. Businesses around the world are tapping into its potential, while exploring how it will impact their long-term strategies. Some are exploring web3, and how they can make strong communities based on decentralised principles. Others are building virtual worlds and selling metaverse land. And many more want to embark on a journey of metaverse analysis, to keep track of the burgeoning and vibrant area.

The potential is huge. A market opportunity worth billions is open for businesses and consumers, ready to tap into the next era of spatial computing. But the area is dense, too. Multiple kinds of fraud, and a lot of misconceptions, have warped the market and obscured where to look. This article will dispel some common answers, to help guide you on your way.

If you are interested in keeping up to date on the latest metaverse analysis each week, consider checking out the Immersive Wire. The concise newsletter will give you an edge, with a robust analysis of the market each week.


Contents

What is the main idea of the metaverse?

At its heart, the metaverse is a confluence of contingent technologies that will shape the future of the internet. The form it takes is up for debate, as some focus on the decentralised nature of web3 and how it will form new kinds of ownership. Virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) could play a part as well, though some companies focus on different technologies in differing ways. Meta is focusing on a broad swathe of immersive technologies, such as VR. Niantic is focusing on AR, and how it could build a real-world metaverse. And Animoca Brands focuses on the core principles of web3.

The difficulty of metaverse analysis is that the definition is still under debate. One reason is that it is hard to say what shape it will take. Ask someone in the 1900s to predict the future, and the response would be based on their own experiences and language. The same is true here. But at its core, we know that it will form a new version of the internet that will connect people together in new and immersive ways.

How can we do metaverse analysis?

Based on the above, it may be tempting to say that we cannot analyse the metaverse at all. How can we focus on something so intangible, or vague? How can companies cut through the noise, when few can agree on the core principles of what it is? But in reality, it is still possible to cut through and find broad trends on where the market can go. A few principles to follow:

  • Keep a sceptical mindset. Many people attempt to fleece people who lack an understanding of the space. Examples include buying NFTs when they are worthless, or contributing to projects that get pulled away. Before putting money anywhere, keep a cautious eye out.
  • Look at the data. Rather than focus on qualitative insights on Twitter, see if you can find information from trusted resources that collate information. WeMeta is one example, who also tracks the value of metaverse land.
  • Keep an eye out for new opportunities. Metaverse analysis can go well beyond current trends, such as a focus on improving workplaces and enterprise training. It will open new doors for creatives and professionals, unlocking new types of services that are difficult to predict. Keep an eye out for them and then follow it down the rabbit hole of enquiry.
Metaverse analysis includes scrutinising data, such as the falling floor price of metaverse land in 2022. Photo credit: Tom Ffiske. Data from WeMeta.
Metaverse analysis includes scrutinising data, such as the falling floor price of metaverse land in 2022. Photo credit: Tom Ffiske. Data from WeMeta.

What is the metaverse market size?

Hard to say. The difficulty in answering the question is that we are attempting to evaluate the potential of two key areas. One is how it will impact businesses and their key processes today, such as how they reach customers and improve their own workplaces. The other is evaluating whole new markets that are nascent today, such as creatives who sell apparel for online worlds.

With that said, a few companies have taken a stab at evaluating the metaverse market:

  • Frost & Sullivan: $750bn by 2030;
  • McKinsey & Company: $5trn by 2030;
  • Citi Bank: $13trn by 2030.

All these numbers should be taken with a grain of salt. The disparity between them all spans trillions, or the value of multiple countries. Metaverse analysis is difficult because we are dealing with a growing area with a lot of potential, but the most profitable areas over time are difficult to say. Still, we should expect the market to be worth a lot in the years to come.

The potential value of the metaverse market. Photo credit: Tom Ffiske.
The potential value of the metaverse market. Photo credit: Tom Ffiske.

What do experts say about the metaverse?

Nearly all experts agree that the metaverse will bring a lot of value for customers and businesses, though they focus on different areas. Some focus on the decentralised principles of web3, and how it will form new communities that will rupture the current modes of loyalty programmes. Others look towards the spatial parts of the metaverse, and how people will converse and trade in new virtual worlds.

With that said, here is a selection of what experts say about the metaverse:

  • Matthew Ball, investor and analyst, from his blog: ‘We can guess that the Metaverse will revolutionize nearly every industry and function… [and] altogether new industries, marketplaces and resources will be created to enable this future, as will novel types of skills, professions, and certifications. The collective value of these changes will be in the trillions.’ (His book is excellent, by the way).
  • Tim Sweeney, CEO of Epic Games, on VentureBeat: ‘This Metaverse is going to be far more pervasive and powerful than anything else. If one central company gains control of this, they will become more powerful than any government and be a god on Earth. What we want is not a company but a protocol, that anyone can implement.’
  • Robby Yung, CEO of Animoca Brands, on Decrypt: ‘There is no metaverse without web3, because you need to have that transaction layer so that you have interoperability between content and you can bring it from place to place.’

Does the metaverse have a future?

While the shape of the future is under debate, there is no doubt that the metaverse has a future of some kind. Companies like Meta are investing billions into the market, innovating on hardware and launching high-quality VR headsets. (CCS Insight reckons that Meta will add a neural sensor by 2025). Large companies like Yuga Labs, which did not exist before 2021, grew to be valued in the millions in a short space of time. Creatives are already forming decentralised communities, curating access via tokens. All of these trends will continue in some shape, even if the destination remains obscured.

Still, it is difficult to say which part will win over. Perhaps decentralised communities will thrive and grow quickly, while VR remains nascent. IDTechEx predicts that major metaverse players will continue to work together, which mirrors my own views. Or perhaps metaverse platforms will evolve to become the go-to places to socialise, becoming a home for millions of users around the world. Or perhaps AR glasses will finally take shape, providing an overlay of the real world which people can interact with. All of this is possible, but hard to predict when it comes to timings or success.

Based on my own metaverse analysis, the best experiences will be frictionless and powerful. The platforms or technologies that thrive will be easy to use, access, and interact with. If that happens, mainstream adoption will come swiftly. One example could be that the metaverse thrives on mobile, which Daren Tsui, CEO of Together Labs, predicts as well.

Where can I learn about the metaverse?

The best places I have found have some level of curation. Twitter and Discord remain great places for conversations, and I have had a fair few hearty debates from time to time. But it is also riddled with misconceptions and misinformation. The sites should not be fully trusted for high-quality information unless you follow trusted people that cite their facts.

So beyond social media, I trust a few places to learn more about the topic. One is in a selection of metaverse books which I have curated, where each one focuses on a different part of the conversation. All of them have some value, though I recommend cherry-picking a few areas to focus on. I also trust a few sites as well; The Drum provides an excellent newsletter on the marketing, side, for example. The site can be found alongside a variety of other metaverse newsletters I trust.

As mentioned, I also run a concise newsletter on the topic, which helps to brief professionals each week. Have a look, and I hope it helps you with your journey!


Subscribe to the Immersive Wire newsletter

Level up your knowledge of VR, AR, and the metaverse with rigorous and high-quality analysis, to gain a competitive advantage against your peers. By subscribing, you also receive a free PDF copy of the Immersive Reality Revolution, a bestselling book on the industry. Curated by Tom Ffiske every Wednesday and Sunday, and enjoyed by over 5,000 professionals.

By subscribing, you agree to the Privacy Policy of the site. You can unsubscribe at any time. If there are any issues, please contact the administrator here.


Meditative with the VIVE Flow. Photo credit: Tom Ffiske

Tom Ffiske

Editor, Immersive Wire

Tom Ffiske is the Editor of the Immersive Wire, a weekly newsletter on the immersive industry.

The post Metaverse analysis: Everything you need to know about the market appeared first on Immersive Wire.

]]>
TRYO is a new try-on app working with Cartier, Gucci, and Adidas https://www.immersivewire.com/exclusive-tryo-try-on-app-cartier-gucci-and-adidas/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 09:25:04 +0000 https://www.immersivewire.com/?p=12395 14 November 2022 - TRYO is a new multi-brand and multi-category virtual try-on app, working with Cartier, Gucci, and Adidas at launch.

The post TRYO is a new try-on app working with Cartier, Gucci, and Adidas appeared first on Immersive Wire.

]]>
Your weekly briefing on the metaverse // 14 November 2022
by Tom Ffiske

Executive summary:

  • Exclusive story: TRYO is a new virtual try-on app, working with Cartier, Gucci, and Adidas at launch (more below);
  • Hot off the press: Apple is planning a 3D world and video service for its headset;
  • Headline: Meta cut 13% of its workforce, while its share price increased 20% (analysis below);
  • Stat of the week: The value of metaverse land is dropping steeply, with the market cap falling from $5.45bn in January to $1.16bn in November;
  • Useful tool: Three Object Viewer is a plugin that enables 3D content on WordPress, with neat ramifications for immersive tech sites.
  • Conversation-starter: Liberland, an unofficial micronation, is creating a virtual space for its citizens to congregate together. Basically, a strip of abandoned land was claimed by a Czech MP with ambitions for statehood. The nation is now making a virtual world for its citizens to meet — which is one way to avoid getting arrested by Croatian police in the contested land. Unbelievable.

Seeing Sigur Ros live was a lot of fun, though David Attenborough documentaries kept cropping into my head as I watched the show. Also, if you’re heading to Immersive Tech Week, let me know as I will be popping over too – Tom Ffiske, Editor of the Immersive Wire

Want to be fully briefed each week? Sign up to get it directly to your inbox.


Job losses, and the nebulous value of metaverse land

Exclusive story: TRYO is a new app that provides a one-stop location for trying on virtual items.

  • What is it? Announced today, TRYO provides users with a one-stop shopping experience with the ability to virtually try on footwear, watches, hats, and eyewear, updated weekly. The company is launching products from Cartier, Gucci, Adidas, and New Era, with more to come. TRYO was developed by QReal, a subsidiary of Glimpse Group.
  • How does it compare to the competition? It’s an interesting one. TRYO’s product approach is to provide a single location to try on multiple types of apparel with brands, servicing people who want to try things in a single location. Compare this to Snapchat, where browsers can browse on their social platform and pop on items to try on in-app.
  • A part of me thinks this is smart, as there may be a market segment of people who want a dedicated place to try on new clothes virtually. The search intent is strong in the app too; people are there to buy items, unlike Snapchat. Another part of me thinks that it will be tricky, as competitors already have audiences while TRYO will need to prove its proposition. One to watch.

Meta cut its workforce by 11,000 spurring another round of discussions on its future.

  • Why did this happen? Mark Zuckerberg pinned it on the rapid and seismic recruitment drive the company undertook during Covid, swelling the workforce. When the appetite for online commerce subsided dramatically — alongside a drop in revenue — job cuts became necessary. ‘I got this wrong, and I take responsibility for that,’ he said in a letter to colleagues.
  • The mood in Meta is ‘bewildering,’ according to my sources. Also, recruiting has been disproportionally affected, as Meta will continue its hiring freeze.
  • I suspect Meta may have upskilled the whole industry. XR-related roles are in high demand at the moment, and Meta has let go of people who are leading in immersive technologies. It would not surprise me if a Meta employee helps to pioneer a competitor over the next two years. If that happens, that’s an incredible story.

Metaverse land is taking a dip, though it is hard to say why beyond macroeconomic conditions. Here is my analysis, though as a summary:

  • Declining value: The value of metaverse land has shrunk over the last year, as the market cap across major metaverse platforms declined from $5.45bn in January to $1.16bn in November (more in the article);
  • Fewer participants: The number of active buyers declined, from a height of 16,257 buyers in May 2022 to 9,346 in October 2022;
  • Macroeconomic conditions: The clearest reasons for the decline are directly linked to the wider economic climate;
  • Lack of utility and high speculation: While both reasons may contribute to the declining value of metaverse land, there is not enough evidence to firmly prove it as a broader trend. The area warrants further studies and investigation;
  • Interoperability: My core argument is that metaverse land needs multiple platforms to connect together, in order to be viable (more in the article).

What do you think of Meta’s layoffs? Join the discussion and meet like-minded professionals on the Immersive Wire Discord.


My new audiobook

The Metaverse: A Professional Guide is now available as an audiobook on Audible! Listen to the audio version of the book, highly rated by professionals in our space. One review from Amazon: ‘It is definitely a book worth reading and for those who know more there are lots of facts, insights and explanations across the metaverse, AR, VR, and its applications. As Tom Ffiske outlines, this is a never-ending journey so I’m pleased to have started the journey with this book’

Get it in your region:

USAFrance
UKGermany

Elsewhere


Important stories over the last week

Got stories? Do let me know at tom (at) immersivewire (dot) com. 

  • A Swiss anthropologist and Japanese VTuber published a report on harassment in the metaverse.
  • ABI Research reported that 30% of total AR shipments, and 23% of VR shipments, will include cellular connectivity by 2027
  • Among Us VR is now out.
  • Anything World, the platform for developing interactive 3D experiences through ML, raised $7.5m in funding.
  • atmoky integrated its Spatial Audio Web SDK into 8th Wall‘s WebAR engine.
  • ENGAGE launched ENGAGE Link, its enterprise-focused metaverse platform.
  • Groove Science Studios, the creator of Soundscape VR, announced new artists like Pigeons Playing Ping Pong, Big Wild, and Hermitude.
  • Immerse Global Summit will take place between 5 – 7 December at Fontainebleau Miami Beach.
  • Meta is acquiring Audio Analytic for an unannounced sum.  
    • Additionally, the company is selling the Quest 2 Headset with Resident Evil 4 and Beat Saber bundled in, for a limited time.
  • Metaverse Tech‘s software, VBuddies, is a Tech Nation’s Rising Stars 5.0 Cambridge City Winner.
  • Missing Pictures is a documentary collection that will launch across VR platforms on 1 December.
  • Palmer Luckey made a VR headset that kills the user when they die in-game.
    • No, this is not a joke.
  • Pimax is crowdfunding a console that can turn into a VR headset.
  • Spatial announced a partnership with Exclusible, working on metaverse real-estate.
  • Space Shells, a rogue-lite VR shooter, will release on 6 December.
  • Spinview announced a partnership with Kvalitena AB to digitise its property portfolio and meet ESG reporting requirements.
  • Stranger Things VR will release in late 2023.
  • Unity officially merged with IronSource.
  • Varjo announced additional platform support for Unity and Unreal Engine projects.
  • XR Women is celebrating its two-year anniversary in AltspaceVR.

Looking for assistance

Want to receive help from readers of the Immersive Wire? Send an email with ‘looking for assistance’ in the subject line to tom (at) immersivewire (dot) com.

  • This could be you! If you need help, let me know.

Subscribe to the Immersive Wire newsletter

Level up your knowledge of VR, AR, and the metaverse with rigorous and high-quality analysis, to gain a competitive advantage against your peers. By subscribing, you also receive a free PDF copy of the Immersive Reality Revolution, a bestselling book on the industry. Curated by Tom Ffiske every Wednesday and Sunday, and enjoyed by over 5,000 professionals.

By subscribing, you agree to the Privacy Policy of the site. You can unsubscribe at any time. If there are any issues, please contact the administrator here.


Meditative with the VIVE Flow. Photo credit: Tom Ffiske

Tom Ffiske

Editor, Immersive Wire

Tom Ffiske is the Editor of the Immersive Wire, a weekly newsletter on the immersive industry.

The post TRYO is a new try-on app working with Cartier, Gucci, and Adidas appeared first on Immersive Wire.

]]>
Analysing the potential of metaverse land and real estate https://www.immersivewire.com/analysis-metaverse-land-real-estate/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 13:04:07 +0000 https://www.immersivewire.com/?p=12316 The value of metaverse land and real estate may rise in the future, but it is beset by core issues with platforms and high prices.

The post Analysing the potential of metaverse land and real estate appeared first on Immersive Wire.

]]>
It’s safe to say that the popularity of metaverse land has surged. $1.93bn of virtual land has been bought throughout 2022. Brands from Gucci to Heineken have bought plots across a variety of platforms, from Decentraland to The Sandbox. Some companies use the virtual land to host seismic marketing activations to reel in potential customers. Others are simply holding the land for a long time, hoping its value will rise before selling it for a profit. All have found that the rush for real estate is heating up.

In response, the value of land shot up swiftly. ‘When we first sold land, it was all sold at $20 a pop, and we sold it all,’ said Sam Hamilton, Creative Director of Decentraland Foundation in an interview with Euronews. ‘Now, I think the cheapest you can buy is $3,500. So, you can see the speculators have already made a lot of money.’ The desire for builders reached a peak, too. Sam Huber from Landvault told Fast Company that monthly rents can rise to $60,000, with a 70% profit margin for select projects.

But what comes up may go down, and the declining market cap tells a new story. If the floor price of land across major platforms is multiplied by its total supply, we see a steady decline in value:

Data from WeMeta

We’ll touch on the potential reasons why soon. But for now, I will say that the value of metaverse land is nebulous, lacking the concrete or tangible value of real-life properties. Owners do not lounge in armchairs, cook breakfasts, or play with children in pixelated lawns. The locations are constrained, bound by the laws and restrictions of platforms. People are buying land across disconnected virtual worlds, instead of a persistent one where we all operate in a single space.

This article will analyse metaverse land and real estate as a whole, exploring its long-term viability across metaverse platforms and virtual worlds. While virtual land has promise in the years to come, the short-term activity lacks the concrete foundations that can hold it firmly in place. 

By the end, I will make a core argument: that metaverse land will only become a viable investment when multiple metaverse platforms become interoperable with one another.

Executive summary: 

  • Declining value: The value of metaverse land has shrunk over the last year, as the market cap across major metaverse platforms declined from $5.45bn in January to $1.16bn in November (more in the article);
  • Fewer participants: The number of active buyers declined, from a height of 16,257 buyers in May 2022 to 9,346 in October 2022;
  • Macroeconomic conditions: The clearest reasons for the decline are directly linked to the wider economic climate;
  • Lack of utility and high speculation: While both reasons may contribute to the declining value of metaverse land, there is not enough evidence to firmly prove it as a broader trend. The area warrants further studies and investigation;
  • Interoperability: My core argument is that metaverse land needs multiple platforms to connect together, in order to be viable (more in the article).

Contents

The article is meant to be read through, but if there is a particular area that draws you in, feel free to hop around the contents:

Analysing the value of metaverse land and real estate

The cryptocurrency space is going through a chilly winter period, as traders stride through the blizzard. The dip pairs with the global economic climate, as we face a bear market and larger tech firms face difficult employment decisions. The International Monetary Fund cut its forecast for global growth, slowing to 2.7% in 2023. While sales of virtual locations slow, China’s seen an equivalent drop in its own homes and buildings.

It is clear that it contributed to the downturn, to some extent. As well as the dip in floor price, there has been a reduction in people buying virtual land from metaverse platforms. From a sizable peak earlier in the year, the number of unique buyers has declined between June and October:

Data from WeMeta

Additionally, the floor price has fallen over the year, drifting downwards from its heights earlier in the year (sans Otherside, which will be explained later in the article):

Data from WeMeta

Such a drop is significant, and macroeconomic trends are a factor. But the drop may also reflect metaverse land cruising up the Gartner Hype Cycle, as it is (currently) stepping down the Trough of Disillusionment. Beyond the clear economic contributions, there must be qualitative factors linked to the platforms themselves.

Our gut reaction is that metaverse land is ‘pointless,’ which ties to the decline in its value. The trouble is, there is not enough evidence for this.

Potential reasons for the drop in sales

One potential problem with metaverse land is that it is much more prone to speculation. Real-life land is more stable by comparison, as the factors that contribute to its value remain consistent. Proximity to roads, city centres, or popular locations rarely changes quickly in the property market. Compare that to land in metaverse platforms, which is more nebulous in nature. The rigid and firm barriers of real life give value to properties.

Another is lack of utility. Professionals buy the land as an investment, and then hold it over time. The land itself can then be used for running new activations or marketing campaigns, such as Heineken with its own work in early 2022. But beyond flashy minigames and events, there is less of a draw to using the land for many purposes. Beyond hosting major events, the land becomes unused over time.

Both reasons are probable, but unproven. No surveys exist that prove the above, only quotes and suggestions from users. Yet paired with economic conditions, they likely played some role for many speculative buyers.

Are daily active users an indication of success?

No virtual world wants to be as barren as a desert. The more people that visit and enjoy a virtual space, the more people that visit and network in the location, referring more friends to visit, and so on. Spaces need a persistent reason to visit regularly, whether it is social interactions, self-improvement, or discovery. Footfall is important here, like in real life.

Astonishingly, some metaverse platforms see few users who visit regularly. After a viral report where DappRadar reported 650 daily active wallets, Decentraland stepped in to show its own analytics. Still, the company recorded only 8,000 daily active users, as of October 2022. ‘[Decentraland] doesn’t view users as a product by which to measure success,’ the organisation said in a blog post. Earlier in the year, Decentraland unveiled that 108,000 people visited Metaverse Fashion Week.

Then again, daily active users may not be the best indication of success. In an interview with Bloomberg, Yat Siu argued that figures only really account for wallet transactions, or users with wallets — which he equates to measuring a population based on how many trades in a stock market. Instead, he recommends focusing on revenue or job creation.

Also, treating them as event spaces shows other ways in which platforms can have value; 108,000 virtual attendees is nothing to sniff at. ‘For many metaverse platforms, it’s better to think of them like an event space that is used for a specific purpose,’ said Rob Stone, Head of Z3. ‘You don’t expect anyone to be in a football stadium at 3am on a Wednesday, but come game day there will be tens of thousands in the stands.’

The arguments are convincing, and show the multiple wrinkles of measuring success. Fundamentally, platforms are reliant on users joining and enjoying the places they visit regularly and connecting with one another. No party can be fun with just a few people. No town square is fun to hang in when the buzz is at a low ebb. No street of virtual homes can be appealing when no life operates within its walls. And there is little potential for exponential growth if users do not return (more on that later).

Metaverse land in decentraland
Credit: Decentraland

Otherside as an exception

One potential exception is Otherside, a project run by Yuga Labs and developed by Improbable. The data above deliberately removed the company, as it skewed the overall trends of the year. If Otherside was added, we see a different story:

Data from WeMeta

Otherside dominated the number of land sales this year, capturing almost 70% of unique buyers across all competitors. When we talk about metaverse land, we might as well only talk about Otherside (to an extent). The initial surge also ruptured the Ethereum blockchain, causing gas fees to spike upwards. During the drop, an estimated $175m in transaction fees wafted to the ether.

Does that make Otherside the most suitable platform to invest in? Perhaps, but we should be careful. Otherside has not officially launched yet, with an ambitious roadmap that will take it through 2023. By the time it launches, users will reap the rewards of the land that they have bought during the mint or the second-hand market. Once it does, we should have a clearer indication of popularity and sustainability. One to keep an eye on.

Do business professionals care about the metaverse?

What about a wider business context? Are real estate professionals rolling up their virtual sleeves, getting ready to work on bits and bytes of concrete? While there is some interest, it has not been converted into direct actions. A report from Pi Labs found that business professionals are aware of the metaverse, but not discussing the topic or implementing a strategy:

Pi Labs report on the metaverse and real estate
Credit: Pi Labs

Such apathy may indicate differing objectives. With tough economic conditions ahead, a fixation on interest rates may take priority over locations and conditions.

That’s not to say that all businesses are ignoring virtual town halls or meetings. DXC Technology surveyed its employees, after 1,000 visited DXC Virtual World for a two-day event; 61% look forward to returning. Synpulse, a management consultancy, invited all 116 members of its leadership team to a virtual town hall for workshops and speeches. ‘It was a productive day with a completely new setup and experience,’ said Ingo Muschick, Senior Partner and Head of Strategy at the company.

But while it indicates an interest in virtual spaces for meetings and collaboration, it does not link directly into metaverse land or real estate. Ownership of virtual land is not a necessary prerequisite to building online experiences, nor should it be. Private virtual worlds can be built and deployed without paying money for rent or virtual spaces.

The issues with metaverse land

Taken together, metaverse land faces multiple items to consider, with varying degrees of evidence:

  • Prone to speculation: Property markets always have a veneer of speculation, as buyers make bets on the long-term potential of land over time. Metaverse platforms take the same concept, and ramp it up to 11. Without the limitations of real life, people pour speculation and hype into the new gaps—burning people in the process. This lacks firm evidence, and warrants further investigation.
  • Lack of utility: Brands buy locations to organise events or put up billboards, to either reach new customers or signal that they are innovative. But beyond the flash and fun, the land itself lacks further uses over time. This lacks firm evidence, and warrants further investigation. Additionally, Otherside is attempting to be an exception, with the land having additional attributes such as creatures.
  • Tied to attendance numbers: The value of land is partially tied to the number of people who enjoy visiting platforms over time. If fewer people visit a location, then the viability of the location is ham-strung by low attendance numbers. There is evidence for this, though the events argument is compelling.

All these factors may play a part, but also reveals the work that needs to be done to understand the area better. For all the social posts we see about it, it’s clear that an evidence-based approach is needed to understand the drop better.

That said, I wanted to put forward my own additional argument on when to buy metaverse land. I am convinced that the tip-off point for viable metaverse land is reliant on one factor (among many above).

The Sandbox on metaverse real estate
Credit: The Sandbox

Core argument: ‘Metaverse land will only become viable when there is widespread interoperability’

The value of metaverse land is reliant on the platform it is in. If Decentraland declines and dies, then the land becomes worthless. At least real-life properties can be made in failed locations so that new opportunities can be opened up. A failed shop can become a successful hairdresser, for example. But if a metaverse platform dies, the land and property persist. No dust, no dereliction. A dead city, its failure perfectly preserved.

How can metaverse land retain some level of strength? I believe it requires a network effect of multiple metaverse platforms that come together, and connect with one another. I do not believe that the networking effect can happen within a single platform, and certainly one where the value of land is valued in the thousands. I do not believe it is a viable business goal to own a platform where land ownership out prices most people.

Other potential benefits:

  • Stable groups: Communities can form, safe in the knowledge that they can move to another neighbourhood;
  • More competition: It embraces more competition, as platforms innovate to draw people into their own virtual worlds;
  • Reduced prices: It encourages lower costs, as a wider pool of supply crunches costs. A stability safeguard, now and for the future.

Multiple metaverse platforms do not need land purchases at all, which is viable as well. After all, real estate is valuable because it takes time to travel from one place to another, and proximity raises prices. But in a virtual world where people can teleport, and land can be visited anywhere instantly, how important is it? If a metaverse platform is designed correctly, ownership is superfluous and hinders creativity. A blockchain may not be necessary either; Multiverse sold 1,000 land plots since November, without using the technology.

Counter-arguments to the thesis

The insights are based on my own research and thoughts on the topic, though there are some important gaps:

  • Commerce: Depending on the goal of the metaverse platform, land ownership may be necessary. Perhaps commerce needs virtual ‘lots,’ as people browse virtual stores in one space. That would require a single location where similar places are together, and location matters in that case. The main street has higher foot traffic than a side street, for example. That would require land, and some lots may be more valuable than others;
  • Revenue: Metaverse platforms need to make money, and real estate is one way in which a company can support itself;
  • Gameplay: Some metaverse platforms may add attributes to land to make it more engaging. Otherside is one example, and it has potential when it launches soon.

The value of metaverse land in the future

The next key question is whether the decline in value will persist in 2023. For my own money, we are clearly leaving the hype cycle of inflated expectations, ebbing to a cool and considered price that closely resembles its true value. The market cap is declining, but may rise up once economic conditions improve and platforms grow in value.

But for future growth, I strongly believe that interoperability is a prerequisite for growth. Not the only factor, or perhaps the most important – but it’s a cornerstone fact that, I believe, will spur fast adoption of land in the future.

I want to avoid the preserved graveyard of metaverse properties. No platform can thrive if there is a risk of abject failure. A solution comes down to interoperability, though it will take time for arrival. In the meantime, keep a cautious eye on the market in the comfort of your real-life home.


Subscribe to the Immersive Wire newsletter

Level up your knowledge of VR, AR, and the metaverse with rigorous and high-quality analysis, to gain a competitive advantage against your peers. By subscribing, you also receive a free PDF copy of the Immersive Reality Revolution, a bestselling book on the industry. Curated by Tom Ffiske every Wednesday and Sunday, and enjoyed by over 5,000 professionals.

By subscribing, you agree to the Privacy Policy of the site. You can unsubscribe at any time. If there are any issues, please contact the administrator here.


Meditative with the VIVE Flow. Photo credit: Tom Ffiske

Tom Ffiske

Editor, Immersive Wire

Tom Ffiske is the Editor of the Immersive Wire, a weekly newsletter on the immersive industry.

The post Analysing the potential of metaverse land and real estate appeared first on Immersive Wire.

]]>
Will ~8% of PS5 owners get a PS VR2? https://www.immersivewire.com/will-8-of-ps5-owners-get-a-ps-vr2/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 01:23:45 +0000 https://www.immersivewire.com/?p=12298 7 November 2022 - China wants to export 26 million VR headsets by 2026, and Sony has high prices for its headset.

The post Will ~8% of PS5 owners get a PS VR2? appeared first on Immersive Wire.

]]>
Your weekly briefing on the metaverse // 7 November 2022
by Tom Ffiske

Executive summary:

  • Headline: China wants to export 26 million VR headsets by 2026, and Sony has high prices for its headset (more below);
  • Stat of the week: DappRadar reported that $1.93bn has been spent on virtual land this year;
  • Conversation-starter: VC investments into metaverse start-ups have been falling since 2021;
  • Interesting company: Lumirithmic made a scan of my face, and I like the tech a lot. The UK-based company is making high-fidelity scans of faces while focusing on gaming and skincare. (More company updates below).

I have started a new role at Accenture, shaping its global thought leadership on the metaverse within the Metaverse Continuum Business Group. The Immersive Wire will stay as-is. Happy to answer questions via responses! – Tom Ffiske, Editor of the Immersive Wire

Want to be fully briefed each week? Sign up to get it directly to your inbox.


Movements in China, updates from Sony

China wants to export 26 million VR headsets by 2026, according to its Ministry of Industry and Information Technology.

  • The country hopes to sell $48.2bn of hardware and software over a five-year period, and will support 100 ‘metaverse-facing’ companies as well.
  • This would be integrating with the local plans laid out by Shanghai and Shenzhen over the last year.

Sony announced the PlayStation VR2 (PS VR2) will be $550, sending jitters in the VR gaming space.

  • I am unsure how quickly Sony will sell two million units in 2023. The con is that the PS VR2 is a $550 tethered headset, hooked to a $400 console which is still a struggle to buy in some places. For context, Sony has sold 25 million PS5s; so the company expects ~8% of PS5 owners to also buy the VR headset.
  • On the other hand, PlayStation’s IPs are very strong. Horizon: Call of the Mountain (made by Guerrilla and Firesprite) will be a huge draw for many fans of the series, drawing people into the ecosystem. It is also cheaper than the original PS VR; Ben Lang commented that the full kit was originally launched in 2016 at $500, or $618 in today’s money.

What do you think of China’s announcements? Join the discussion and meet like-minded professionals on the Immersive Wire Discord.


My new audiobook

The Metaverse: A Professional Guide is now available as an audiobook on Audible! Listen to the audio version of the book, highly rated by professionals in our space. One review from Amazon: ‘It is definitely a book worth reading and for those who know more there are lots of facts, insights and explanations across the metaverse, AR, VR, and its applications. As Tom Ffiske outlines, this is a never-ending journey so I’m pleased to have started the journey with this book’

Get it in your region:

USAFrance
UKGermany

Elsewhere


Important stories over the last week

Got stories? Do let me know at tom (at) immersivewire (dot) com. 

  • Bepensa (who bottles Coca-Cola products in Mexico) worked with ARuVR on training its employees.
  • CareerCon is a virtual event designed around the future of work and web3, happening from 9 – 10 November.
    • Disclaimer: I provided PR support for hundo, the organising company, earlier this year.
  • DIVR LABS is running a VR set-up in Westfields London, where families hunt dinosaurs in a free-roam space.
    • I liked it a lot. Apart from hiccups with the Wifi streaming, it was an entertaining experience I can see working well with a broader family.
  • GEENEE AR added generative AI to its body tracking capabilities.
  • HoloKit X is a $129 AR headset that works with iPhones.
  • International XR-Metaverse Conference called out for papers for its upcoming event.
  • ITV Studios will work with Virtual Brand Group to build metaverse experiences with The Voice.
  • Lumirithmic made a scan of my face, and I like the tech a lot.
    • Out of stealth recently, the UK-based company is making high-fidelity scans of faces while focusing on gaming and skincare verticals. It makes me think that scanning tech will ramp up in speed and quality in 2023.
  • M&S launched its first virtual influencer, MIRA.
  • Mojo Vision added the Alexa Shopping List app to its AR contact lens.
  • Open Metaverse Alliance opened its first working groups, asking for help.
  • Orlando Economic Partnership and Unity have unveiled a first-of-its-scale digital twin of the 800-square-mile Orlando region.
  • Ralf Lauren debuted a clothing collection in Fortnite.
  • Razorfish found that 70% of web3 adopters treat virtual goods to the same level (or more) as real ones.
    • Not surprising, but I would like to see a study that asks normal consumers if they feel the same.
  • Roblox and the Parsons School of Design found that 75% of Gen Z consumers are willing to spend money on digital fashion.
  • Shores of Loci, a VR narrative puzzle game, launched on Meta Quest 2.
  • Snap partnered with Amazon to bring the Amazon Fashion glasses range to Snapchat users.
  • Sony Pictures Virtual Reality revealed the name of their VR game based on the Ghostbusters franchise, Ghostbusters: Rise of the Ghost Lord, coming in 2023.
  • UN-ESCWA became the first UN agency to adopt the Metaverse Safety Week Global Awareness Campaign.
  • United Kingdom‘s Online Safety Bill will also impact metaverses, according to Ofcom.
  • Warner Bros. and HBO announced plans for ‘Game of Thrones’ NFTs.
  • Zappar announced its second annual virtual conference, AR Pioneers 2022.
  • Zebra Labs raised $5m in funding to make a metaverse for musical artists.

Looking for assistance

Want to receive help from readers of the Immersive Wire? Send an email with ‘looking for assistance’ in the subject line to tom (at) immersivewire (dot) com.

  • Alex Ruhl who leads Metaverse for PwC UK is looking for a metaverse technology consultant and a metaverse strategy specialist to join her team. The open roles are here and here.

Subscribe to the Immersive Wire newsletter

Level up your knowledge of VR, AR, and the metaverse with rigorous and high-quality analysis, to gain a competitive advantage against your peers. By subscribing, you also receive a free PDF copy of the Immersive Reality Revolution, a bestselling book on the industry. Curated by Tom Ffiske every Wednesday and Sunday, and enjoyed by over 5,000 professionals.

By subscribing, you agree to the Privacy Policy of the site. You can unsubscribe at any time. If there are any issues, please contact the administrator here.


Meditative with the VIVE Flow. Photo credit: Tom Ffiske

Tom Ffiske

Editor, Immersive Wire

Tom Ffiske is the Editor of the Immersive Wire, a weekly newsletter on the immersive industry.

The post Will ~8% of PS5 owners get a PS VR2? appeared first on Immersive Wire.

]]>
The Metaverse: A Professional Guide – Available on Audible https://www.immersivewire.com/audible-release/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 11:46:42 +0000 https://www.immersivewire.com/?p=12296 The Metaverse: A Professional Guide gives experts insights and guidance on how to navigate the burgeoning world of immersive technologies. By the end, you will have a firm grasp of the metaverse and all the contingent technologies that link to its foundations. Above all, this book comes from the heart. An honest, no-bullshit outlook of… Read More »The Metaverse: A Professional Guide – Available on Audible

The post The Metaverse: A Professional Guide – Available on Audible appeared first on Immersive Wire.

]]>
The Metaverse: A Professional Guide gives experts insights and guidance on how to navigate the burgeoning world of immersive technologies. By the end, you will have a firm grasp of the metaverse and all the contingent technologies that link to its foundations.

Above all, this book comes from the heart. An honest, no-bullshit outlook of the metaverse and its development, from someone who has seen both the good and the bad. I hope you enjoy the journey.

The book is also available as an ebook or paperback on Amazon, in your local region.

Get it in your region:

USAFrance
UKGermany

Elsewhere

Readers know that I have a less-than-rosy view of current metaverse discussions. Pundits oscillate between sense and nonsense, exploring vague ideas with unclear words that fogs discussions.

The lack of clarity is a shame, because as someone who has followed the space for some time, there is plenty to discuss and be optimistic about. Many parts of immersive technologies tie into metaverse discussions which people should see, based on my experiences across the spectrum.

I’ve been writing about immersive technologies since 2016, through a small blog that I started in London. The blog evolved into a twice-weekly newsletter called the Immersive Wire, which you are reading now. The newsletter has exploded since then, and I have met a range of amazing people – who will all be profiled in this book.

So, what is it about? As the metaverse develops, conversations around the topic have been cluttered and opaque. What is the metaverse? Why is the metaverse important? And what will the metaverse look like?

The Metaverse: A Professional Guide sorts the sense from the nonsense, giving experts insights and guidance on how to navigate the burgeoning world of immersive technologies. By the end, you will have a firm grasp of the metaverse and all the contingent technologies that link to its foundations.

Chapters of the book:

  • Preface – How the metaverse coincides with immersive technologies
  • Overview of VR, AR, and the metaverse
  • Hopping through a metaverse
  • The right design principles for building immersive products
  • The long-running ramifications of Covid-19
  • Charting the business direction
  • AR glasses: Hype and realism
  • Alternative uses of immersive technologies
  • A commentary on the VR/AR and metaverse industry
  • Immersive and the arts
  • Meta’s seismic influence
  • How to market immersive technologies
  • Bibliography

Find more from the author

The book came about from the Immersive Wire, a leading newsletter that covers immersive technologies, such as VR, AR, and the metaverse. With the clutter regarding VR/AR technologies, it is important to cut to it and identify the most vital innovations within the space.

The Immersive Wire analyses the most important growth areas, just for you.

Subscribe

* indicates required

The post The Metaverse: A Professional Guide – Available on Audible appeared first on Immersive Wire.

]]>